"Transmediation" means changing things from one mode or medium to another. In the process of doing this, we often generate new ideas or figure out how to organize differently what we already have. Below are three options for you to try out this idea with 1 or 2 colleagues in lab.


Option 1 - Transmediation of your narrative
1. By searching on Google Images or some other online source, find and copy/download pictures that you think represent the important ideas in your narrative. You may want to use Screenhunter to copy images and/or to use Wiggio to collect them with your partner(s); you may also use MediaConverter.org to pull video and/or sound from YouTube videos.

2. Use Windows Movie Maker (which comes with all PCs--MAC users can use iMovie) to arrange your images/videos/sounds in an order that makes sense to you. To do this, use Mike's Movie Maker instructions; when you're done, make sure to save your project as a movie, then upload it to your personal page on the wiki. Alternatively, you could use Comeeko to make your narrative into a comic, or simply insert and position images in your MS Word document.

3. When you've finished, compare your transmediation to your original text--what, if anything, is different, and why? What have you learned from this process? Post to the discussion forum on this page.


Option 2 - Research as a dialogue between scholars
1. Now that you have collected a variety of resources and research about your topic, imagine that you want to create a dialogue between the things you have found. What would this researcher say to that one? What would this scholar have to say about that resource?

2. To create this dialogue you may:
  • Pull quotes and/or screen captures (using Screenhunter) from the articles/resources you have found. Copy or import these quotes and images into Protopage. Then arrange them in an order that makes sense to you. Next, post the link to your protopage tab to your wiki personal page. Finally, post to the discussion forum on this page about what you have learned from this process.
  • Using Google Images or some other online source, find and copy/download pictures that you think represent the important ideas in the research/resources you have found so far. You may want to use Screenhunter to copy images and/or to use Wiggio to collect them with your partner(s); you may also use MediaConverter.org to pull video and/or sound from YouTube videos. Use Windows Movie Maker (which comes with all PCs--MAC users can use iMovie) to arrange your images/videos/sounds in an order that makes sense to you. To do this, use Mike's Movie Maker instructions; when you're done, make sure to save your project as a movie, then upload it to your personal page on the wiki.

3. Finally, post to the discussion forum on this page about what you learned from this process.



Option 3 - Practicing data collection
In the ethnography "My Freshman Year" by Rebekah Nathan, a professor goes "undercover" and enrolls as a freshman at her own university. Go here and scroll down the bottom of the page to read excerpts from Nathan's research. When you've read some of her take, your job is to go out and collect data of your own on the college student experience! To do this, you cannot count on your own experience alone: what you know may not be what others experience. To gather evidence, you will need an open mind and whatever tools you have at hand:

1. What tools do you have to gather evidence? Take a notebook for recording observations or interview responses, a watch to note how long certain events last, and a cell phone to take pictures you can email to yourself later.

2. With half an hour to gather data, where might you go in the vicinity of Bessey Hall? What might you learn from looking into classrooms, at wall posters, at what people are wearing, etc.?

3. Once you have gathered evidence with your colleagues, return to our classroom and compile your evidence; to do this, you may want to upload documents or images to Protopage, to Wiggio, or to the wiki with your partners.

4. How will you arrange your evidence to make a convincing argument to us about college life? You might want to use Windows Movie Maker (which comes with all PCs--MAC users can use iMovie) to arrange your images/videos/sounds in an order that makes sense to you. To do this, use Mike's Movie Maker instructions; when you're done, make sure to save your project as a movie, then upload it to your personal page on the wiki. Alternatively, you could use Comeeko to make your findings into a comic, or simply insert and position images in an MS Word document.

5. Finally, post to the discussion forum on this page about what you learned from this process.