"Transmediation" means changing things from one mode or medium to another. In the process of doing this, we often generate new ideas or figure out how to organize differently what we already have. Below are three options for you to try out this idea in lab.

Here are some examples of the sort of end result you might produce:
From A Prairie Home Companion - "P.O.E.M. (Professional Organization of English Majors)", and "Sound Effects Script"
(And you can read more about doing this with students (without technology) as "Reader's Theater"....)
From This American Life - "Two Steps Back: How Great Schools Go Bad"
From "Ghetto Life 101"


Group 1: http://www.divshare.com/download/6635942-2da
Group 2: http://media-convert.com/convert/?xid=7-ggbokfqy
Group 3: http://media-convert.com/convert/?xid=15-fodfprnn

Option 1
1. Use these instructions to import the sound file of your narrative, edit it in Audacity, save and upload it to Divshare, and embed it in the wiki.

2. You can find free sound effects at http://www.grsites.com/sounds/ and http://www.a1freesoundeffects.com/. As you know, you can also pull sound from YouTube videos using MediaConverter.org.

3. When you've finished editing your narrative, make a post to the wiki discussion forum above: what did you learn from this process?


Option 2
1. Listen to one or both of these radio essays: here (What to Make of Students Sexy Clothes) or here (Making an Effort to Outgrow Droopy Drawers).

2. Consider: in your research, how might you create a similar text using audio commentary taken from your sources, your interviews, and other music/sound effects? Plan and script such a presentation based on what you've done so far.

3. Many cell phones now allow a user to record sounds (Under "Music and Sounds") which can then be emailed or downloaded to your computer. Try this out with your phone. (Note: You will most likely need to convert the resulting audio file into .mp3 format in order to hear/use it; do this at media-convert.com)

4. Use these instructions to import the sound file you just created on your phone, edit it in Audacity, save and upload it to Divshare, and embed it in the wiki.

5. When you've finished, make a post to the wiki discussion forum above: what did you learn from re-envisioning your research in this mode?


Option 3
In the prize-winning radio documentary "Ghetto Life 101" by teenagers LeAlan Jones and Lloyd Newman, two natives of the Ida B. Wells housing projects outside Chicago walk the streets interviewing people and commenting on their day-to-day lives. Listen (and/or read) here to as much of their work as you like. Then consider how you might practice creating something similar during part of our lab class:

1. What tools do you have to gather evidence? Take a notebook for recording observations or interview responses, a watch to note how long certain events last, and a cell phone or one of Mike's audio recorders so that you can record your interviews.

2. With half an hour to gather data, where might you go in the vicinity of Bessey Hall? Who might you talk to who could provide perspectives on "College Life 101"?

3. Once you have gathered evidence with your colleagues, return to our classroom and compile your evidence; to do this, use these instructions to import the sound files you've created, edit it in Audacity, save and upload it to Divshare, and embed it in the wiki.with your partners. If you've used your cell phone and emailed the sound files to yourself, you will most likely need to convert the resulting audio into .mp3 format in order to hear/use it; do this at media-convert.com.

4. When you've finished, post to the discussion forum on this page: what did you learn from this process?